The Under-Representation of Minorities in the Electoral College System

  • Gerald Prante Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Business and Economics, Lynchburg College Lynchburg.
Keywords: n/a

Abstract

The Electoral College system for selecting the U.S. president has created a situation where only a
handful of states are relevant on Election Day. Because of the winner-take-all system that
virtually every state uses for allocating their respective electoral votes, voters in swing states
such as Ohio and Virginia are more important to candidates during the campaign than voters in
non-swing states like New York and California. This paper addresses the extent to which the
demographic profile of voters in these important swing states differs from the demographic
profile of the nation as a whole and thereby the extent to which the demographic profile of the
electorate would differ under a popular vote system compared to the current Electoral College. It
finds most notably that minorities are significantly under-represented under the current Electoral
College system. The paper also finds that the following groups are under-represented by the
Electoral College: college-educated, religious, users of public transportation, renters, nonelderly,
those in poverty, and the uninsured.

Author Biography

Gerald Prante, Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Business and Economics, Lynchburg College Lynchburg.

Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Business and Economics, Lynchburg College
Lynchburg.

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Published
2015-03-19
Section
Articles